N. C. Educational Center

N. C. Educational CenterTITLE:
N. C. Educational Center

SUBJECT:
Cultural History

DESCRIPTION:
An article from unknown newspaper reminiscing about Mont Ameona Seminary.

CREATOR:
Staff writer

SOURCE:Mount Pleasant
Unknown newspaper (Cabarrus County, NC). c. 1970s

DATE:
1970s

DATE AVAILABLE:
20th century

DATE CREATED:
c. 1970s

RIGHTS:
Rights reserved by the source institution.

FORMAT
Articles

SPATIAL COVERAGE
United States–North Carolina

SOURCE INSTITUTION
Eastern Cabarrus Historical Society Museum
All rights reserved by the source institution.

CITATION:
Staff Writer, “Certificates Of Graduation Are Presented To 22,” Mont Amoena: Educating the Young Ladies of Cabarrus Couunty 1859-1927, accessed December 27, 2014, https://montamoena.org/2014/12/28/n-c-educational-center/

TRANSCRIPTION:
Unknown newspaper, c. 1970s

N. C. EDUCATIONAL CENTER

Rev. C. L. T. Fisher, Re. Henderson N. Miller, Rev. J. H. C. Fisher, Rev. R. A. Goodman and Prof. H. T. J. Ludwig.

Emphasis was placed on economic operation of Mont Amoena. Cost of tuition was amazingly low by today’s standards. It was possible to attend the school for as low as from $62 to $80 per year, including tuition, room and board, in the 1890’s to less than $200 in the era before World War I. Costs were somewhat higher in the years before the school ended its distinguished career.

Residents of Mt. Pleasant will particularly be interested in this paragraph from the Mont Amoena catalog for 1923-24:

“The town is pleasantly situated in a fertile section of the State, and is free from all malarial diseases. Persons suffering from chills and fever are always benefited, and in some instances cured, by a residence in town. These facts are stated in order that parents may feel safe in sending their daughters to the school.”

Says the catalog of 1897-98:

” The community (Mt. Pleasant) is highly moral and intelligent and is protected, by legislative enactment, from all exhibitions of an immoral tendency, and from the sale of spirituous liquors within its corporate limits. . . .”

The catalog of the school also placed emphasis on physical training for its students, pointing out that in addition to tennis, basketball, and croquet courts, there was a regular walking course prescribed for the young ladies. One capes us, says about the exercise of walking. . . .”The more walking the better.”

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