1890-1891

The Standard (Concord, NC), June 11, 1891, p. 2.

The Commencement at North Carolina College
The Literary Address – Master’s Address – Annual Concer Female Seminary – Commencement Exercises – Other Notes.

[Excerpt}
Mt. Pleasant, the pleasant little ivllage nestled among the hills of Eastern Cabarrus county has been feasting on the rich and rare treats such as are afforded by the closing exercises of North Carolina College and Mt. Pleasant Female Seminary.

The literary address before the societies was delivered by Hon. John S. Henderson Congressman from this district. Mr. Henderson is not what the world calls an orator, but Congressman Henderson in ability scholarly attainments, in a keen insight into great moral and civil matters has justly won an enviable reputation. For more than an hour Mr. Henderson entertained a large audience with a most elegant address on “Physical Mental and Spiritual Culture.”

Prof. W. T. Whitsett, principal of Gibsonville High School, pursued a course for the degree of A. M. His address, “Value of a Definite Purpose in Life,” was beautifully written. Prof. Whitsett is a promising young educator and showed by his address that already he has given much serius thought to the necessities of the age.

ANNUAL CONCERT.

Tuesday night in the auditorium of the seminary the young ladies of that institution, under the direction of Mrs. M. A. Kliffmuller, gave the annual concert perhaps the best in years. Competent critics speak in very high terms of the execution of some very difficult pieces of music. It was noticeable that all the songs were rendered without the music and many of the selections rendered without notes. Mrs. Kliffmuller as a music instructress enjoys quite a reputation.

Prof. Linn read the honor roll which was quite lengthy, showing good results. A diploma was awarded to the only graduate, Miss Lula K. Fisher, M.t Pleasant. The medal given to the member of the intermediate class for general excellence was won by Miss Mable Barrier though Misses Weimar and Cassidy, of South Carolina, were close competitors. The medal was presented by Rev. C. B. King in a very appropriate speech. The medal for the highest general average for the session was won by Josie Linn, of Illinois. The medal was happily presented by Prof. Fisher.

Prof. J. A. Linn who tendered his resigignation, ans which was reluctantly accepted, has been re-elected president of the seminary. A very successful term closes under the temporary management of Misses Shirey and Mrs. Kliffmuller.

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From Our Church Paper (New Market, VA), Vol. 19, No. 24, June 17, 1891, p. 3.

Commencement at N. C. College and Mt. Pleasant Female Seminary.

These exercises were held June 7-10. The Baccalaureate sermon by Rev. C. B. King, on ” The Vanity of Human Independence,” was based on John 15,6. In the afternoon, the address before the Young Men’s Christian Association was made by your correspondent. It was founded on Luke 7, 12. At night Rev. C. A. Rose preached a sermon for the Woman’s H. and F. Miss. Society of the Seminary. ” Missions and encouragement thereto,” was his theme. Monday morning, the contest for the declaimer’s modal was held. Victor C. Ridenhour won it over five others. The junior orations occupied the afternoon. The night was claimed by tho Pi Sigma Phi Literary Society. Addresses were made by its President C. Brown Cox, its representative, L. M. Swink, and two ex-members, Revs. Paul Barringer and R. S. Patterson. Hon. John S. Henderson, M. C., gave the literary address Tuesday morning, followed later in the day by one from Prof. W. J. Whitsett. That night the closing exercises of the Seminary were concluded. The musical part of the program was directed by Mrs. M. A. Kliffmuller. There was one graduate—Miss Lula K. Fisher of Mt. Pleasant. Two medals were awarded. One for best average grade in junior class was presented by Prof. C. L. T. Fisher to Miss Josie Linn, of Ill.; the other for excellence in middle class, presented by Rev. C. B. King to Miss Mabel Barrier was the gift of Rev. and Mrs. W. R. Brown.

Wednesday morning made glad the seniors. The four seniors, Messrs. H. N. Miller, R. L. Patterson, R. L. Bame, and H. E. H. Sloop made speeches and received diplomas. Patterson made the salutatory in Latin ; Miller, the valedictory. Medals for various attainments were presented to Messrs. V. C. Ridenhour, M. A. Roger, C. Brown Cox, Luther S. Shirey, Chas. A. Brown, and W. W. J. Richie by Revs. C. H. Cox, Paul Barringer, J. I. Goodman, C. B. King, C. L. T. Fisher, and R. S. Patterson. The degree of A.M. was conferred upon Prof. W. S. Whitsett, of Gibsonville, N. C., Revs. Geo. H. Cox and H. M. Petrea, of Mt. Pleasant, J. Lee Deaton, of China ‘Grove, and W. A. Deaton, of Selwood, S. C., while Rev. F. W. E. Peschau, of Wilmington, N. C., will hereafter be a D. D. The graduates had their Class Day four in the afternoon and the Philalaethian Literary Society held boards for night. The writer has not complimented any address, because all were alike good. As a whole the exercises were an honor to the institutions. North Carolina College is doing a good work, and destined, it is believed, to have a brighter day. It surely was a Faculty ready to do and die for it. They believe in it, and show their confidence by the sacrifices they make for it. Pres. Shirey is an old war horse, tried and true, and falters not because of impediments; Prof. Ludwig has for eighteen years stood by the college, no matter what the outlook ; the two Fishers furnish the enthusiasm, but it is tempered with knowledge. They are a power. The other teachers are alive to their work.

The friends of the Seminary will be glad to learn that Rev. J. A. Linn, who had resigned its presidency, was re-elected. He accepted. The teachers will be unchanged, except that Miss Julia Shirey will go to Lutherville.

Three of the graduates of North Carolina College will study theology at Gettysburg. Thus the college is repaying the church at large for the patronage and assistance given it.— God speed the day when our weak colleges in the South shall receive the endowment and patronage they justly deserve.

J. I. Goodman.

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